Berlin

Welt aus Schrift – World as Words

[threefourths_columns]

[/threefourths_columns] [onefourth_columns_last] [/onefourth_columns_last]

Welt aus Schrift – The 20th Century in Europe and the USA

At its heart, this exhibition, organized by the Art Library, explores the sign system formed by the many alphabet fonts used in Europe and the USA since 1890, and how that sign system was variously dissected and recreated over time in books, magazines, advertising, posters and printed matter of every kind. With more than 500 objects on display, visitors are granted a comprehensive insight into the linguistic diversity of graphic design.

Photos of the Welt aus Schrift posters outside the Kunstbibliothek, Berlin. An excellent exhibition focussing on European and American fonts and applied graphics.

Satisfying my love of Bauhaus it was great to see works and artefacts by Moholy-Nagy, Mies van der Rohe and of course Herbert Bayers’ Universal.

Whilst physically compact the exhibition covers a lot of ground with high walls covered. It would be great to see this exhibition travel.

Kulturforum Berlin

Kulturforum Berlin

Berlin, Everyday’s Like a Sunday Here

bauhaus posters

One of the reasons I ride a motorbike is that I don’t like sitting in traffic, and when sat in traffic in Exeter I may well rant,

“if I am sat in traffic at least it could be because everyone’s going somewhere interesting!”

No such problem in Berlin, the argument falls over on both sides. It is difficult not to find somewhere interesting but if you are in traffic you are unlikely to get stuck: these roads are wide, really w-i-d-e. As a pedestrian it is wise to plan your journey across one well, there’s not a huge amount of traffic but you will need to cover ground at pace.

But these wide empty roads are one reason why it feels like everyday’s a Sunday here.

I like Cycling – but

Now I like cycling but I’m not sure about the Berlin cycling scene. I did go into a seriously cool little bike shop but, if I may refer briefly to the exhibit to the left, WTF?

There is an overland gas pipeline in Berlin, a rather jaunty pink affair, it travels throughout parts of the city, up and over roads, along the central reservation. What we are looking at here would seem to be a fairly close relation, indeed the lovechild of the gas line. This ‘bike’ is not so much a ‘step-through’, more a ‘trip-over.’

Part bike - part gas pipeline

Part bike - part pipeline

The cyclists here are seriously militant too. Once you have acclimatised to the semiotics of the cycleways (basically a tone or two darker than the host footpath) things aren’t too bad, but stray onto the dark grey stuff as a pedestrian at your own risk and when the bicycles are made out of gas pipeline they will hurt.

However these upright cyclists are well dressed, not in lycra and are another reason why every day feels like a Sunday in Berlin.
 Read more

Mercedes McLaren SLR Stirling Moss


Seen earlier in Berlin, I thought It seemed a shame not to grab a few shots. In truth the car forms a stark contrast to the majority of cars in Berlin which seemed surprisingly unostentatious.

The new Mercedes McLaren SLR Stirling Moss is also characterised by the most sophisticated technology and a breathtaking design which reinterprets the SLR legend. With 478 kW/650 hp the SLR Stirling Moss accelerates its V8 supercharged engine from standstill to 100 km/h in less than 3.5 seconds, and has a top speed of 350 km/h – no other series-production car is at the same time so open and so fast. This extreme concept makes the new high-performance sports car a legitimate bearer of the name of the British motor racing legend and Mille Miglia record-holder Stirling Moss, who drove the legendary Mercedes-Benz SLR racing cars from victory to victory in 1955.

In the 1950s the Mercedes-Benz SLR 300 celebrated victory after victory. It won the Mille Miglia, the Eifel race, the Targa Florio as well as the Tourist Trophy. It was driven by the stars of the time: Juan Manuel Fangio and Karl Kling – and, first and foremost, by the British racing driver Stirling Moss. At ten hours, seven minutes and 48 seconds he still holds the Mille Miglia record.
source

Berlin 2


So the airport (Berlin-Tempelhof) is no longer used as an airport but is now a huge resource for people. Cyclists, kite flyers, RC cars, walkers, runners: there was a marathon taking place. Amongst this activity there is the old fabric of the place and as it would seem with anywhere in this city there is a huge history. In truth I could have spent a lot longer here but we couldn’t get access to the main halls, another day perhaps. However by the front entrance there is a small memorial to Lucius D. Clay

Lucis D. ClayOn June 26, 1948, two days after the Soviets imposed the Berlin Blockade, Clay gave the order for the Berlin Airlift. This was an act of defiance against the Soviets, an incredible feat of logistics (at one point cargo planes landed at Tempelhof every four minutes, twenty four hours a day), a defining moment of the Cold War, and a demonstration of American support for the citizens of Berlin.

Clay with General of the Army D.D. Eisenhower at Gatow Airport in Berlin during the Potsdam Conference in 1945.
Clay is remembered as a hero for ordering and maintaining the airlift, which would ultimately last 324 days, through May 1949. He resigned his post days after the blockade was lifted.
source

Berlin - Templehof

Berlin - Templehof