Cameras

Photographing Training Sessions

No reason for this other than to remind myself that it doesn’t rain every day.

Another day photographing training sessions, an email while I was working asking me if I had something suitable for the front page. Oh, and a quick (soft) drink before the drive back to the Lightroom. This was the view.

Reminder set.

BMW Cafe Racers, Uli Cloesen

Some time ago Uli Cloesen contacted us from New Zealand about using some of our shots of Kevil’s Ruby BMW café racer in his new book. The bike was only around for a short while before going off to it’s new home in Poland. Well it’s been a long but worthwhile wait, the book is out.

This is what WH Smith says,

Many books have been published about BMW motorcycles, but this is the first to cover the evolution of the BMW sportsbike to the BMW cafe racer. A marque not commonly associated with the cafe racer scene, the growing trend of custom BMW cafe conversions is illustrated in detail with stunning images of sporting, racing, and ‘cafed’ BMWs. From Airheads to Oilheads, modified singles to parallel twins, Fours and Concept 6s – see the ‘cafed’ side of BMW.

I say there’s some neat bikes very neat bikes indeed.

OK, so WHSmith.co.uk weren’t the quickest to deliver but hey, Uli told me it was the cheapest place to get it so here you go, it’s the hardback too.

Sun!

The problem with having a humungous head is that if someone offers you a small helmet (stoppit) you will have to politely decline. In doing so you may miss the opportunity of riding a Kevil’s BMW café racer up the hill past Hay Tor on the first sunny day since Richard the Third parked his Astra in Leicester.

Yes, Kev assumed I would be travelling light on the GS, but no, I had brought the full compliment: Nikons, Leicas, reflectors and most of the Manfrotto timeline. So we ended up with two bikes a car, a T5, a trailer and a shuttle service up and down the hill.

Anyway, it sunned, on the bikes, the early morning dog-walkers, the woman in pink on a horse, the PCSO who stopped to say hello and latterly the ice-cream man.

Afterwards we went to The Hound of the Basket Meals and ate dogs.

Quote of the day? (Kev) “I didn’t know this was here” (Dartmoor)

Kevil’s at the Rio Paignton

A quick (GS) trip down to Paignton on a bright but chilly winter’s morning leave one finger tonally different to the others and a severe possibility that the planned photo shoot may have started from a transit at the side of the A380.

Two naughty boys strapped to the trailer and ready to go to the beach only the dog walkers ready to spoil surprisingly good conditions. Yep: the Leica, Kev with the Lastolite, Ally with the coffee, the man with the mate in America, the Doberman, the Alsation, the boy with his mum, the boy with the wave board, the man who had to take a call and the annoyed lady who is always annoyed.

Sorted.

Assembling The Leica M9: Vimeo

If you have an interest in Leicas, and I do, this may be of interest.

It’s funny how technology develops, the 35mm film format could be considered an accident, existing because of movie film,

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35 mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements. He built his prototype 35 mm camera (Ur-Leica) around 1913, though further development was delayed for several years by World War I. Leitz test-marketed the design between 1923 and 1924, receiving enough positive feedback that the camera was put into production as the Leica I (for Leitz camera) in 1925. The Leica’s immediate popularity spawned a number of competitors, most notably the Contax (introduced in 1932), and cemented the position of 35 mm as the format of choice for high-end compact cameras.
Source

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The Sandpit by Sam O’Hare: Vimeo


Another great Vimeo moment here, a day in the life of New York City, in miniature. This short by aero director/ VFX artist Sam O’Hare is inspired by films like Koyaanisqatsi

Winner:
Prix Ars Electronica Award of Distinction 2010
Original Music:
composed by Human, co-written by Rosi Golan and Alex Wong.

Please view in HD and full screen for best effect.

SAM: It is shot on a Nikon D3 (and one shot on a D80), as a series of stills. I used my Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 and Sigma 50-150mm f/2.8 lenses for all of these shots. Most were shot at 4fps in DX crop mode, which is the fastest the D3 could continuously write out to the memory card. The boats had slower frame rates, and the night shots used exposures up to two seconds each. The camera actually has an automatic cut off after 130 shots, so for longer shots I counted each click and quickly released and re-pressed the shutter release after 130 to keep shooting.

ME: That has to be a lot of stills!

SAM: I shot over 35,000.

For more of this discussion about the shoot, camera, lenses and workflow, please see here.